Chamberlain's of Norwich, Co Norfolk
Synopsis: Part of a study of Chamberlain's from Norwich, Co Norfolk, England

Surname Index Page Co Norfolk Page Chamberlain's of Norwich My Chamberlain's Other Chamberlain's of NorwichSources

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Henry Chamberlain (c.1620-1666) of Norwich

The following chart contains the descendants of Henry Chamberlain (c.1620-1666), a pinner of Norwich, Co Norfolk. In the course of this research, I examined all Chamberlain's appearing in the various Norwich parishes to determine which, if any, are connected to this family. Charts on the unrelated Chamberlain's can be found via the relevant link above.


There are few Henry Chamberlain's listed in the IGI, born between 1610-1625, the feasable DOB range for Henry, below.

1. Henry Chamberlin, Birth: About 1610 Hingham, died after 29/7/1674, married Jane.
2. Henrye Chamberlyng, baptised: 04 OCT 1612 Upton, s/o Henry.
3. Henry Chamberlain, Birth: 1618-1620 Wymondham, s/o Henry & Joan, died 3/12/1678, Massachusetts, USA
4. Henry Jr. Chamberlin, Birth: About 1618 Hull, Norfolk, died 1678.
5. Henry Chamberlain, Birth: 1619-1630 Hingham, s/o Henry & Jane, died 3/12/1678, Massachusetts, USA
6. Henry Chamberlain, Birth: About 1620 Wyndham, s/o Henry & Joan, died 3/12/1678, Massachusetts, USA

It is evident here that there are in fact only 3 Henry's, one born around 1620-1630, either Hingham or Wymondham, Co Norfolk, a 2nd is his father (with a likely off the mark guess for his DOB) and a Henry baptised at Upton. The entries in the IGI without an exact DOB are, of course, of dubious accuracy.

FreeREG has two Henry Chamebrlain's:
1. Henry Chamberlyng, baptised 4/10/1612, St Margaret, Upton, s/o Henry
2. Henry Chamberlaine, baptised 10/12/1620, Wymondham, s/o John

Henry Jr of "Wymondham/Hingham" has emigrated to the USA by the time of his marriage in the 1650's, so can be safely discounted. An examination of the Wymondham baptisms in FreeREG indicate the presence of a William, John & Dennis Chamberlain having children around 1620, but no trace of a Henry. An examination of the Hingham baptisms in FreeREG reveal a John & Robert in the 1610's and 1620's, a Richard, John & Henry in the 1630's (including a Henry Jr baptised 1635). The Henry who emigrated to the USA would neatly fit the Henry Jr baptised Hingham in 1635 (thus married in his 20's). This leaves Henry Jr, born 1612, Upton, and Henry (s/o John) born 1620, Wymondham. No further trace of either of these Henry's is found in the respective parishes indicating they likely emigrated or moved to another parish in Co Norfolk. Henry of Upton is probably too old to have been the Henry below. Henry s/o John is a good match insofar the DOB and note also Henry below named his 2nd known son John. Was this after his father? Incidentally, the claim that the Henry who died 1678 in the USA was born Wymondham is I suspect a result of faulty research, confusing Henry Jr baptised 1635, Hingham, with Henry s/o John, baptised 1620 Wymondham. Hingham is about 10km distant from Wymondham, by road. Note that a cousin of Henry baptised 1620 Wymondham, moved to Norwich by the 1640's, about the time Henry, below, appears in Norwich. Refer to the "Other Chamberlain's of Norwich" chart for additional details on the Wymondham Chamberlain's.

One additional possibility can be found in St Stephen's, Norwich with the marriage of John Chamberlyne and Barbara Coop, 27/7/1615, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3] Henry did name a son, John. A subsequent marriage of John Chamberlyne & Nahomy Bacon, 31/1/1642, St Stephen, Norwich,[3] may be a son of John & Barbara and a possible brother of Henry, below. The oldest known sibling of Henry baptised 1620, Wymondham, was baptised 1616. Could John & Barbara who married in 1615 be the parents of this family, and Henry below?


1. Henry Chamberlain,[3,4] probably born between 1615-1625. Pinner/pinmaker, 1654, 1660, 1662/1663, 1663, 1664/1665, 1666.[4] Died 1666 and buried 4/10/1666, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Cause of death was the plague.[4] Married Susan.[3,4] Susan died after 4/10/1666.[4]

Children of Henry Chamberlain & Susan:
*
i.
 
Henry Chamberlyne, baptised 13/1/1645, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3]

ii.

Sarah Chamberlaine, baptised 10/12/1648, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3] Possibly the Sarah who had an illegitimate daughter, Susan Chamberlin, baptised 3/7/1681, St Michael at Thorn, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]
*
iii.

John Chamberlaine, baptised 17/12/1654, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

iv.

Christian Chamberlaine, baptised 8/4/1660, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1662/1663 & buried 20/1/1662-1663, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

v.

Mary Chamberlain, baptised 22/2/1662-1663, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1663 & buried 7/7/1663, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
** vi.
Mary Chamberlaine, baptised 5/2/1664-1665, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1734 & buried 18/7/1734, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk (widow).[1] Married Thomas Hassal, 1/4/1684, St Remigius, Dunston, Co Norfolk.[2] Thomas born before 1665, died 1723 & buried 6/1723, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1] For additional generations refer to the Hazell charts.
Children: (a)
 
Thomas Hassal, baptised 8/8/1686, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]
(b)
William Hussel/Hassel, baptised 16/5/1689, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market.[1]
(c)
Susan Hassel, baptised 9/12/1690, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]
(d)
John Hussal, baptised 5/10/1692, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]
(e)
Samuel Hussal, baptised 7/9/1695, St Mary Magdalen, Pulham Market, Co Norfolk.[1]

   
Medieval Pins
Medieval Pins
Image - Historiska museet
Present day Bubonic Plague victim
Present day Bubonic Plague victim
Image - Further Adventures of Indigo Red (Blog)
St Remigius, Dunston
St Remigius, Dunston
Image © Norfolk Churches
The medieval pin was usually of iron topped by a head of solid pewter sometimes inlaid with glass or a semiprecious stone. In the 12th century medieval pins became very thin and delicate in their construction, being made from drawn wire, with the head manufactured separately. The medieval pin head in turn then became smaller and plainer. In the 16th century brass pins became common but retained the large head in solid or hollow-cast brass; but by the beginning on the 17th century the head, though still rather large, was fashioned from a second piece of wire wrapped around the shank. The head usually consisted of three turns and was anchored by means of a blow from a treadle-operated stamp that spread the top of the shank. On occasion the blow was sufficiently hard to flatten the head at the same time. This method continued in use until the early 19th century. 17th & 18th century pins vary greatly in size, ranging from lengths in excess of 5" (hairpins) down to less than 3/4", the latter sometimes being hardly thicker than a hair. A few pins of all sizes were made from iron wire. Common pins probably had small spherical or hemispherical heads that were hammered into shape or soldered on. Pins were also headed with globs of glass or with the end of the wire bent over and wound around the top of the shank. Because of their delicate nature, few have survived today.[55]
Norwich experienced its last epidemic of Bubonic Plague during 1665-1666; this resulted in most of the wealthy citizens leaving Norwich. Unemployment became a serious problem, followed by a severe food shortage in 1666, which was only averted by huge catches of herring which were brought ashore at Great Yarmouth. Agricultural wages in East Anglia were very poor and country life became increasingly difficult; this prompted people to move from the country into the city in search of work. The textile industry was recovering from a slump as new interest in fashion meant there were employment opportunities for many. Norwich was now exporting its cloth to Europe, North America, India and China. By the early 1670’s Norwich had a population of around 21,000 and was probably the largest provincial town in England.[History of Norwich] A report in the London Gazette, dated 22/8/1666, concerning deaths from the Plague, read in full "The Account of our Bill of Mortality for this last week runs thus, Buried of all Diseases 218, where of the Plague 201, besides at the Pesthouse 2."[Early Newspapers] The Great Plague (1665-1666) was a massive outbreak of bubonic plague in England that killed an estimated 100,000 people, 20% of London's population. It was on a far smaller scale than the earlier "Black Death" pandemic, around 1350 and was remembered afterwards as the "great" plague because it was the last widespread outbreak of plague in England.[Wikipedia] Bubonic plague is the best known manifestation of the bacterial disease plague, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis. The term "bubonic plague" was often used synonymously for plague, but it does in fact refer specifically to an infection that enters through the skin and travels through the lymphatics, as is often seen in rat flea-borne infections. Bubonic plague kills about half of infected patients in 3–7 days without treatment. The fleas seek out other prey when their rodent hosts die. The bacteria form aggregates in the gut of infected fleas and this results in the flea regurgitating ingested blood, which is now infected, into the bite site of a rodent or human host. Once established, bacteria rapidly spread to the lymph nodes and multiply. Yersinia pestis bacilli can resist phagocytosis and even reproduce inside phagocytes and kill them. As the disease progresses, the lymph nodes can haemorrhage and become swollen and necrotic. Bubonic plague can progress to lethal septicemic plague in some cases. The most famous symptom of bubonic plague is painful, swollen lymph glands, called buboes. These are commonly found in the armpits, groin or neck. The bubonic plague was the first phase of the infection. The plague also spread to the lungs and became the disease known as the pneumonic plague. This form of the disease is highly infectious as the bacteria can be transmitted in droplets emitted when coughing or sneezing. Other symptoms include spots on the skin that are red at first and then turn black, heavy breathing, continuous blood vomiting, aching limbs, coughing, and terrible pain. The pain is usually caused by the actual decaying, or decomposing, of the skin while the person is still alive. The disease has claimed nearly 200 million lives since the first recorded epidemic ravaged the Byzantine Empire during the sixth century.[Wikipedia]
The village of Dunston is quite small, with a population of just 107 in 1845 (and an aera of 600 acres). In 1881 the population had dropped to 73. Nearly all the parishioners died of the plague in 1349. St Remigius, Dunston, as with many of the churches just south of Norwich, is a rather lonely and remote building - access is via a several hundred metre walk from a nearby road. The church is rather small and was heavily restored (and Victorianised) in the late 1800's. The church however retains its rural feel, both inside and out. It is part of the parish of nearby Stoke Holy Cross. The church is a pretty structure consisting of nave, chancel, and square tower with pinnacles and three bells. It is chiefly in the early Decorated style, and partly Perpendicular; and was restored in 1844.[Norfolk Churches, GenUKI]
     
St Stephen, Norwich, Ladbrooke, 1820s
St Stephen, Norwich, Ladbrooke, 1820s
Image - Norfolk Churches
St Stephen, Norwich
St Stephen, Norwich
Image - Norwich Churches
St Stephen, Norwich (inside)
St Stephen, Norwich (inside)
Image © Norfolk Churches
St. Stephen's Church has a long and rich history within the city of Norwich. It is thought that a church may have existed on the site from Saxon times. The earliest known reference to St. Stephen's appears in a charter of Henry 2nd (1154-1189), giving posession of the funds of the church to the Cathedral Priory. In 1205 a charter appropriated the church to the office of the Chamberlain of the Priory for the clothing of the monks. By 1304 a charter ordained the church as a vicarage. St Stephen's is located in what at the time was known as the 'French Borough' (roughly today's Mancroft Ward), home to French settlers brought in by the Norman rulers to keep order with the Saxon inhabitants. The Mancroft churches (St Stephen, St Peter Mancroft & St Giles) were established to serve this new area. Around 1350 St. Stephen's was built as a stone and flint church. The base of the tower and part of the walls date from this period, the same time period the city walls were built. The present day building was restored and largely rebuilt in the 16th century when the central part of the church had become unsafe. The Tower is the church’s dominating & distinguishing feature. The lower half is predominantly knapped flint. The chequered effect is created by white stone. The offset tower, forming what is effectively a three-storey porch at the west end of the north side, is unique among larger medieval churches in East Anglia. There is evidence that prior to the reformation there were five separate chapels each with its own altar. The church remains the centre of a thriving Church of England religious community, visitors are always very welcome.[St Stephen's, Norfolk Churches, Norwich Churches]



1.1. Henry Chamberlyne (s/o Henry), baptised 13/1/1645, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3] Pinner, 1672/1673.[4] Died 1678 & buried 17/11/1678, St Paul, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,33] Grant of Administration for Henry Chamberlaine, of Norwich, made 1678.[9] Married 1st unknown. Married 2nd Susanna Wales, 30/12/1670, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Both resided Tivershall St Margaret, Co Norfolk, at the time of the marriage.[4] By licence.[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & unknown:

i.
 
John Chamberlaine. Died 1666 & buried 27/9/1666, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Cause of death was the plague.[4] {The most obvious placement of John is the s/o Henry Sr, however evidence strongly suggests his son was the John who died 1692: both John & Henry Sr were pinners, both named daughters Christian, both spent most of their lives in the parish of St Stephen, Norwich and John also named a son Henry}

Children of John Chamberlain & Susanna Wales:

i.
 
Mary Chamberlaine,[4] born between 1670-1672. Died 1672/1673 & buried 19/2/1672-1673, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

ii.

Henry Chamberlin, baptised 30/7/1671, St John de Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

iii.

Henry Chamberling, baptised 20/1/1676, St Paul, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Died & buried 1677, St Paul, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,15,33]

iv.

Susan Chamberlin, baptised 20/2/1677, St Margaret, Tivetshall St Margaret, Co Norfolk.[5]

v.

Thomas Chamberling, baptised 12/4/1678, St Paul, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8] Died & buried 1678, St Paul, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,15,33]

   
St Paul, Norwich, 1937
St Paul, Norwich, 1937

Image © George Plunkett
interior view east, St Paul, Norwich, 1938
interior view east,
St Paul, Norwich, 1938

Image © George Plunkett)
25-33 Barrack St, St Paul, Norwich, 1938
25-33 Barrack St,
St Paul, Norwich, 1938

Image © George Plunkett
14-18 Peacock St, St Paul, Norwich, 1936
14-18 Peacock St,
St Paul, Norwich, 1936

Image © George Plunkett
St Paul's, Norwich, was located just to the north of the city centre, in the area of Coslany & Pockthorpe. By the early 1900's the medieval streets had given way to factories and the terraced houses where the workers lived. St Paul's was a healthy parish with a sizable congregation. Barrack Street formerly continued across Cowgate, terminating at Peacock Street. On its northern side stood St Paul’s Church with its round Norman tower, gutted by incendiary bombs in the early morning of 27/6/1942; after standing as a roofless ruin it was demolished ten years later, despite pleas that the tower should remain. The site today is partially covered by a playground and by the Norwich ring road. St Pauls' had the largest of Norwich's five round towers. The church was restored in the 19th century, but the structure was still discernible as that of a 15th century Perpendicular church against a Norman round tower. In the 1700's the church had fallen on hard times, in 1773 William Utten wrote that the very path to the north door was overgrown with weeds and that the drainage was from the graveyard to the church. Inside, the walls were green and filthy with pavements bad and rain coming into the vestry. The pavements, doors, seats, walls and windows were all wretched, the gallery was out of repair and its removal was recommended on safety grounds; the tower was bad and the churchyard walls falling down. The church was restored several times after that, including twice in the early 1900's. Apart from its architectural merits, this church was of particular interest in that originally it served not only the parish but also a hospital for poor strangers, vagrants, sick and impotent folk. Founded between 1118 and 1145, it became known as Norman’s Spital from a monk of that name who was one of its earliest masters. From 1571-1583 it was occupied as the city bridewell. Much of the medieval parish of St Paul's has also been demolished, replaced by a shopping centre and Sovereign House. Of the square surrounding the churchyard, William White wrote in 1883: "A rookery of disgraceful tenements in St Paul’s has been demolished under the Artizans’ Dwelling Act, and a colony of trim cottages erected in their place." 30 years later, Mr F. T. Hibgame, wrote: "The most picturesque square in the whole city at that time [Norwich Fifty Years Ago] was St Paul’s, which showed a complete square of singularly quaint half-timbered houses. It looked very much then as no doubt it did in mediaeval times; but alas the jerry builder came along, down came all the old houses, and in their place arose dozens of hideous red-brick cottages, all exactly like one another, without a single thing to redeem their innate ugliness." 23-33 Barrack Street were the last remaining medieval dwellings in the parish and were demolished shortly before WW2.[Norfolk ChurchesGeorge Plunkett's Old Norwich]
   
St Margaret, Tivetshall St. Margaret
St Margaret, Tivetshall St. Margaret
Image © Penny Cannell, Pictures of England
Cottage, Tivetshall St. Margaret
Cottage, Tivetshall St. Margaret
Image © Penny Cannell, Pictures of England
15-17 Theatre St, St Stephens, Norwich, 1936
15-17 Theatre St, St Stephens, Norwich, 1936
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
The area around Tivetshall St Margaret is intensely agricultural and several 100 years ago villages like Tivetshall would have supported a vast range of trades and occupations - Norfolk villages were virtually self-sufficient. Tivetshall originally was originally two parishes, with two churches, Tivetshall St Margaret & Tivetshall St Mary, the later was destroyed in the 1940's. St Margaret sits in the midst of fields, surrorounded by its crowded graveyard. The early 14th century chancel seems oddly 'stuck on' to the rest of the church, due to its steeply pitched roof which is also higher than the rest of the church, almost as if it was a farmworker's cottage tacked on. The church appears to have been relatively unaltered during the Victorian period (it was restored in 1862) so retains much of it's earlier Medieval character and appearance, inside and out. In 1841 the parish of St Margaret's covered 1698 acres and had a population of 368, which had only slightly changed by 1883 (then 339 residents).[Norfolk Churches, GenUKI]



1.2. John Chamberlaine (s/o Henry), baptised 17/12/1654, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1692 & buried 19/11/1692, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47] Pinmaker, 1686, 1687, 1688, 1690/1691, 1692.[4] Married Anne.[4,6] Anne died between 1685-1688. Married 2nd Rebeckah,[3,4,47] before 12/1688. Rebecca married 2nd Elve Peke (Pike?), 20/2/1698-1699, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Rebecca died 1726/1727 & buried 12/3/1726-1727, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Anne:

i.
 
Christian Chamberlin.[4] Died 1680 & buried 4/1680, St Paul, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,33]

ii.

Ambrose Chamberlin, baptised 30/10/1681, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,6]
*
iii.

John Chamberlin, baptised 17/12/1682, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,6] {S/o Anne}

iv.

Henry Chamberlaine.[4] Died 1686 & buried 24/6/1686, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,47]

v.

Elizabeth Chamberlin, baptised 26/7/1685, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,6] Married Edward Gibson, 15/9/1708, Church, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]
Children: (a)
 
John Gibson, baptised 27/6/1709, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Died 1709 & buried 11/12/1709, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
(b)
Edward Gibson, baptised 4/9/1710, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Died 1711 & buried 13/6/1711, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
(c)
Harding Gibson, baptised 23/3/1711-1712, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
(d)
Ann Gibson, baptised 9/4/1714, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Died 1715 & buried 8/8/1715, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
(e)
Crossgrove Gibson.[4] Died 1719 & buried 25/9/1719, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Rebecca:
*
i.
 
George Chamberlain, baptised 10/4/1687, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47] {Mother's name not stated}

ii.

Anne Chamberlain, baptised 16/12/1688, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47] {Mother Rebecca} Married William Nobbs, 7/10/1711, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47]
Children: (a)
 
Thomas Nobbs, baptised 15/11/1713, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,47]
(b)
Rebekah Nobbs, baptised 3/1714-1715, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[47]
(c)
William Nobbs, baptised 2/3/1717-1718, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,47]
(d)
Anne Nobbs, baptised 11/9/1720, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,47]
(e)
Sarah Nobbs, baptised 11/8/1724, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,47]
(f)
Charles Nobbs, baptised 26/4/1728, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,47]

iii.

William Chamberlain, baptised 13/1/1690-1691, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47] {Mother Rebecca} Died 1692 & buried 29/11/1692, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47]

iv.

Rebeckah Chamberlain, baptised 5/2/1692-1663, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4,47] {Mother Rebecca} Died 1694 & buried 13/4/1694, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

 
St James Pockthorpe, Norwich, from Cowgate 1938
St James Pockthorpe, Norwich 1938
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
82-86 Barrack St, St James, Norwich 1936
82-86 Barrack St, St James, Norwich 1936
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
135-141 Cowgate, St James, Norwich 1936
135-141 Cowgate, St James, Norwich 1936
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
St James Pockthorpe (or St James the Less) has one of the more unusual towers in Norfolk. The church is broadly 15th century, but the tower was built within the nave, resulting in a three-way partitioning. As if this wasn't odd enough, the top was given a fancy octagonal turret in the 18th century. For much of the 19th century this church was the home of a particularly firebrand form of Christianity. Until the 1930s, this was a densely populated area of terraced streets and small factories. Virtually all of this has since been demolished, partly due to bombing during WW2 but also city 'redevelopments'. The church was closed in 1972 and since the early 1980s, St James has been the home of the Norwich Puppet Theatre. The church, for the most part of flint, is of Perpendicular style, and consists of a nave, a chancel, and a south aisle that runs the whole length of both - but with no clerestorey. Nineteenth century -restorations took place in 1842 and 1882. This later one saw the insertion of fashionable 'mediśval-style' furnishings, including a screen and a Gothic reredos. The parish of St James was a notorious slum area in nineteenth-century Norwich. It was dominated by the Pockthorpe Brewery. It was one of the early churches to adopt High Church ritual.[Norfolk Churches, Norwich Churches]



1.2.1. John Chamberlin (s/o John, s/o Henry), baptised 17/12/1682, St James with Pockthorpe, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,6] {S/o Anne} Married Elizabeth Tilney, 29/6/1707, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Elizabeth died 1707 & buried 27/7/1707, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Married 2nd Elizabeth,[3,4] c.1707/1708. Elizabeth died 1744/1745 & buried 8/2/1744-1745, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Elizabeth:

i.
 
William Chamberlain, baptised 13/5/1708, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1778 & buried 29/12/1778, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (70yo).[4] Married Elizabeth Pearson, 27/8/1732, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] By banns.[4]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Chamberlain, baptised 20/4/1735, All Saints, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]
(b)
Anthony Chamberlain, baptised 21/1/1738, All Saints, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

ii.

John Chamberlain, baptised 28/8/1709, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1710 & buried 25/4/1710, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
* iii.

John Chamberlain, baptised 28/10/1711, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

iv.

Thomas Chamberlain, baptised 15/8/1714, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

v.

George Chamberlaine,[3,4] probably born between 1700-1720 (from DOB's of children). {Available transcriptions for St Stephen's and most of Norwich are somewhat patchy in the mid to late 1700's. In 1732 & again in 1738 was recorded the burial of a "George Chamberlain s/o George". The later burial cannot be a son of George (1.2.2) given the age of George Sr & his wife at the time, indicating that there was a George in the generation after John (1.2.1) & George Sr (1.2.2). There are two possibities for the identity of this younger George. Firstly that he was an unknown son of John (1.2.1), possibly baptised in a neighbouring parish for which transcriptions are not available. Secondly, he may have been George Jr, born c.1712. The problem with the first scenario is that to date a baptism for George, s/o John, has not been found. The problem with the second scenario is that it would imply that George Jr would have been only 20-21yo when his son, George III, died in 1732. I have gone with the former scenario however note the currently available evidence is consistent with both scenarios} Married Elizabeth.[3,4]
Children: (a)
 
George Chamberlaine.[4] Died 1738 & buried 15/11/1738, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (s/o George).[4]
(b)
Henry Chamberlain, baptised 15/12/1742, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

   

St Stephen's Plain, Norwich 1953
St Stephen's Plain, Norwich 1953

Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
5-7 St Stephen's St, Norwich 1938
5-7 St Stephen's Street,
Norwich 1938

Image © George Plunkett
Browne's Court, 41 St Stephen's St, Norwich 1937
41 St Stephen's
Street, Norwich 1937

© George Plunkett
41-43 St Stephen's St, Norwich 1936
41-43 St Stephen's Street,
Norwich 1936

© George Plunkett
 
 

1.2.2. George Chamberlain (s/o John, s/o Henry), baptised 10/4/1687, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] {Mother's name not stated} Died 1741 & buried 2/4/1741, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Married Elizabeth.[3] Elizabeth died 1741 & buried 24/5/1741, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (widow).[4]

Children of George Chamberlain & Elizabeth:

i.
 
George Chamberlaine, baptised 10/8/1712, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1732 & buried 11/7/1732, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (s/o George).[4]

ii.

Isaac Chamberlaine, baptised 7/11/1714, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1767 & buried 10/5/1767, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (53yo).[4] Married Anne Clarke, 20/5/1737, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] By banns.[4]
Children: (a)
 
George Chamberlain, baptised 26/2/1737-1738, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
(b)
William Chamberlayne, baptised 4/5/1740, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1740 & buried 19/10/1740, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
(c)
Sarah Chamberlain, baptised 22/10/1741, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1744 & buried 9/4/1744, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (inf).[4]

iii.

Rebecca Chamberlain, baptised 6/10/1717, St Michael at Thorn, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

iv.

William Chamberlain, baptised 18/12/1720, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

v.

Anne Chamberlain, baptised 13/1/1722-1723, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Married Richard Andrews, 26/7/1745, St Helen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8] Richard a widower, Anne single, both of St Helen's.[4]




1.2.1.1. John Chamberlain (s/o John, s/o John, s/o Henry), baptised 28/10/1711, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1777 & buried 23/11/1777, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (68yo).[4] Married 1st Sarah Seaman, 25/5/1735, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] By banns.[4] Married 2nd Elizabeth Collings, 15/5/1744, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] By banns.[4] Married 3rd Sarah Parkerson, 14/10/1756, St George Tombland, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8] Sarah of St George Tombland & John of St John Timberhill.[4] Witnesses Matthew Balltis & James Parkerson.[4] By banns.[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Sarah Seaman:

i.
 
John Chamberlayne, baptised 14/3/1735-6, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3]

ii.

Richard Chamberlayne, baptised 14/3/1735-6, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

iii.

William Chamberlayn, baptised 27/8/1736, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

iv.

George Chamberlayn,[4] baptised 20/11/1737, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3] {It is possible this was instead George baptised 1738, s/o Isaac, however the names of George's children more closely match those of the family of George Sr than those of Isaac. Either way, the two possible George's are first cousins} Married Sarah.[3,4,8]
Children: (a)
 
John Chamberlain, baptised 6/5/1763, Saint Martin At Oak, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8] Died 1766 & buried 25/8/1766, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]
(b)
Sarah Chamberlain, baptised 24/2/1765, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
(c)
Henry Chamberlain, baptised 14/12/1766, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1768 & buried 13/11/1768, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (inf).[4]
(d)
George Chamberlain, baptised 11/12/1768, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
(e)
Elizabeth Chamberlain, baptised 26/8/1770, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
(f)
Mary Chamberlain, baptised 18/10/1772, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

v.

Lydia Chamberlain, baptised 4/2/1738-1739, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1747 & buried 4/8/1747, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Elizabeth Collings:

i.
 
Elizabeth Chamberlain, baptised 26/1/1744-1745, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
* ii.

John Chamberlain, baptised 23/4/1746, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Sarah Parkerson:

i.
 
Frances Chamberlain, baptised 3/7/1757, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Married Edward Fitt, 1/6/1778, St Andrew, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

   
St George Tombland, Norwich
St George Tombland, Norwich
Image © Google StreetView
Princes Street, Tombland, Norwich
Princes Street, Tombland, Norwich
Image © Norfolk Churches
Lion & Castle Yard, Timberhill, Norwich
Lion & Castle Yard, Timberhill, Norwich
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
St George Tombland. This is one of two mediśval churches dedicated to St George in Norwich, which may indicate a late foundation date. Tombland is from the Old English for ‘empty land or space’, referring to the site of the late Saxon market. The church is built of flint rubble, but the nave clerestorey is of brick, a high-status material when it was built in the 17th century. The front of the south porch was put there in the 1880s, and bears no relation to its original appearance. Despite being heavily restored in the 1880s, the church retains a good deal of its Georgian furnishings. Bequests from the tower date from the early part of the 15th century, and the rest is probably broadly contemporary. The very top of the tower is a 17th century repair in the Gothic tradition. St George is hemmed in by 17th and 18th century houses. Today the Church of St. George Tombland remain a centre for religious worship.[Norwich Churches, Norfolk Churches] St George Tombland is located on Princes St, just off Tombland. Princes Street is a narrow lane and finding a decent photograph of the church is rather difficult. The websites devoted to the churches of Norwich, as well as various online photograph galleries all show St George's tower seen over the top of nearby buildings. The photograph here was obtained from Google StreetView. From StreetView it appears that much of the medieval parish of St George remains more or less intact, a rarity for Norwich.



1.2.1.1.1. John Chamberlain (s/o John, s/o John, s/o John, s/o Henry), baptised 23/4/1746, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Married Elizabeth Mash, 13/8/1769, St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8] Both single & of St Peter Parmentergate.[4] By banns & both illiterate.[4] Witnesses John Neal & Janet Middlebrook.[4] Married 2nd Sarah Tillyard, 15/10/1780, St Andrew, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8] Sarah born 1757, died 1793 & buried 31/5/1793, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (36yo).[4]

Children of John Chamberlain & Elizabeth Mash:

i.
 
Edward John Chamberlain, baptised 2/5/1770, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] In 1830 voted in the poll for members of Parliament for the city and county of Norwich.[51] Dyer, 1830.[51] Married Elizabeth Howden/Howsden/Housden,[4] 23/12/1793, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8] Elizabeth born 1770, died 1819, St George Colegate, Norwich, Co Norfolk & buried 11/3/1819, All Saints, Norwich, Co Norfolk (49yo).[4] Resided 1830, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[51]
Children: (a)
 
Edward John Chamberlain, born 28/9/1794, baptised 5/10/1794, St George Colegate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8] Married Mary Kezia Drake, 25/12/1811, St Michael Coslany, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]
(b)
John Chamberlain, born 1/4/1797, baptised 2/4/1797, St George Colegate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8]
(c)
Charles Chamberlain, born 20/10/1801, baptised 25/10/1801, St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

ii.

John Chamberlin, born 28/7/1774, baptised 11/6/1776, All Saints, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

iii.

Charles Chamberlain, baptised 22/12/1776, All Saints, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8] Died 11/10/1833, Lakenham, Norwich & buried 15/10/1833, The Rosary, Norwich, Co Norfolk (56yo).[4] Wheelwright, 1830.[51] In 1830 voted in the poll for members of Parliament for the city and county of Norwich.[51] Married Mary Ann Holmes.[4]
Children: (a)
 
Charles Chamberlain, born 3/4/1798, baptised 10/4/1798, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
(b)
Harriett Chamberlayne, born 6/4/1802, baptised 13/4/1802, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
(c)
William Chamberline, born 11/11/1804, baptised 11/11/1804, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4] Died 1805 & buried 13/12/1805, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk (1yo).[4]
(d)
Louisa Chamberlayne, born 27/11/1806, baptised 30/11/1806, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[3,4]
Children: (1)
 
James Chamberlain, born 22/12/1827, baptised 24/12/1827, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4]

iv.

Henry Chamberlain, baptised 8/2/1780, St John the Baptist Timberhill, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4,8]

Children of John Chamberlain & Sarah Tillyard:

i.
 
Sarah Chamberling, baptised 28/9/1783, All Saints, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

ii.

William Chamberlain, baptised 29/4/1792, St John the Baptist Timberhill, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[8]

     
St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich
St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich
Image © "pgchamberlin", Flickr
18-21 Cattlemarket Street, Norwich (1961)
18-21 Cattlemarket Street, Norwich (1961)
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
All Saints, Norwich from All Saints Green (1938)
All Saints, Norwich (1938)
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich. The name seems to be originally from St Peter Per Mountergate (a nearby street). The original building, probably small and in the Norman style, dates from the late eleventh century. In the fifteenth century it was completely rebuilt, financed by the prosperity of its location on a main route through the city, close to the merchants' quays. St Peter Parmentergate became redundant in 1981. In 2005, after being empty for some time, the main church building became the Norwich Centre for Martial Arts. The church, built on a slope, is notable for its great height. The absence of any cusps in the tracery suggests a 'no frills' building budget. Parmentergate is a big, urban church, in a somewhat deceptive setting. It sits in an overgrown graveyard towards the northern end of the Ber Street and King Street area of social housing and rundown warehouses, an area now undergoing regeneration. In past times, this was an important city church. The church sits on a drastically sloping site, so much so that the Priest door in the chancel has a flight of twelve steps leading up to it from the graveyard. St Peter was ultra-Anglo-catholic, as can be deduced from the interior decorations.[Norwich Churches, Norfolk Churches]
All Saints (or All Saints Church Westlegate) sits at one end of All Saints Green. The buildings to the west of the church survived both the blitz and the post-war redevelopment and the view up Westlegate is substantially the same today as it was in the 1800's. All Saints is a typical late-15th century flint church on a small scale - a Norfolk village church in the heart of the city. The tower is patched up, the very top being from just before WW1. All Saints was noteworthy for being one of the most extreme Anglo-Catholic churches in a city famous for them. The earliest documentary evidence for All Saints was a major 'makeover' of an earlier building that occured in the 15th Century. The church was transformed from a place of solid walls and small windows to an elegant framework of columns and arches supporting a handsome, canopy-like roof. The tower is fifteenth century, very plain, without buttresses. Its corners were rebuilt in brick in the nineteenth century. The top stage was rebuilt in 1913. Some traces of the pre-15thC building can be discerned, especially on the inside. The church once stood in a densely-populated area, with its large houses along All Saints Green and many closely packed smaller houses, with numerous coaching inns and public houses along Ber Street and All Saints Green, which was the swine market. The market for sheep and cattle was moved into the Castle Ditches in 1660 from the Haymarket. Many people were connected with this weekly swine market which had moved from All Saints Green to Hog Hill (Orford Place), then nearer the castle. In the 1930s the slum clearance began, and with the death of Fr. Maude-Roxby in 1938, the parish went into a decline. People were moved out to new houses in Lakenham and by the time the 1939-45 war was over, the district was desolate. The market was moved out to Harford in 1960 and most of the new buildings were shops or offices. The church closed in 1973 and since then has been used as a drop-in centre. All Saints has never been deconsecrated, and the chancel has been reordered as a chapel.[Norfolk Churches, Norwich Churches, All Saints]
   
Old Westlegate, towards All Saints, Norwich
Old Westlegate, towards All Saints
Image - All Saints, Norwich
4-10 All Saints Green, Norwich (1936)
4-10 All Saints Green, Norwich (1936)
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
St John Timberhill, Norwich (1938)
St John Timberhill, Norwich (1938)
Image © George Plunkett (DVD Edn)
St John the Baptist on Timberhill is located on the edge of the central shopping area and is one of the smaller medieval churches in the city. This site of this church was originally just outside the Castle Bailey. Timberhill itself was the open area to the south of the church, where a timber market was held. The building had fallen on hard times by the 19th century; the tower collapsed in 1784, the roof was full of holes, and there was a massive restoration in the 1860s to bring it back from the brink. Internally, very little medieval survived. Externally, St John the Baptist is delightful, with that massive 15th century porch and aisles. They also rebuilt the chancel, replaced most of the windows, and a little stone bell turret was added at the west end in 1877. Threatened with redundancy in the 1970's, St John's modern incarnation as a working church dates back to the early 1980s, when it was designated the main church for the new Parmentergate parish, which covers a wedge shape southwards from the town centre containing the predominantly working class King Street and Rouen Road areas. This wedge was originally served by about a dozen medieval parish churches. It is now the largest of the city parishes. 19th century shops screen the castle from the church, but this was the closest church to the Castle entrance, and at one time was known as St John Castlegate. It is said that executed prisoners from the Castle were buried here at this church. On the east wall there is some long-and-short work, which may indicate a date of pre-1066, although Anglo-Saxon building styles continued in use for some time after that date. The present church, which was begun in 1420, replaced a previous building from 1303.[Norfolk Churches, Norwich Churches, St John's]
   
Timberhill Street, Norwich
Timberhill Street, Norwich

Image © Barry Samuels
Wades Court,St Stephen's St, Norwich (1937)
Wades Court, St Stephen's
Street, Norwich (1937)

© George Plunkett (DVD)
52-54 St Stephen's St, Norwich (1962)
52-54 St Stephen's Street,
Norwich (1962)

© George Plunkett (DVD)
St Stephen's Church Lane, Norwich (1936)
St Stephen's Church Lane,
Norwich (1936)

© George Plunkett (DVD)

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[1] FreeREG: <http://freereg.rootsweb.com/cgi/Search.pl>, Search performed for Surname (with soundex) HAZELL, County Norfolk.
[2] Parish registers, 1557-1979, Church of England. Parish Church of Dunston (Norfolk),  Ba:M145151, So:1041498.
[3] IGI, Ba:C/M109751 (St Stephen, Norwich, 1538-1812).
[4] FreeReg, http://www.freereg.ork.uk. Norwich + Chamberlain (phonetic), 1600-1700.
[5] FreeReg, http://www.freereg.ork.uk. Tivetshall + Chamberlain (phonetic).
[6] IGI, Ba:C/M044471 (St James Pockthorpe, Norwich, 1556-1841).
[7] IGI, Ba:C/M044881 (St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, 1538-1875).
[8] IGI, sundry from Norwich.
[9] Norfolk Records Office, Online Catalogue, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/DServe/public/searches/nroquick.htm>. Search for "Chamberl* + Norwich": Wodehouse of Kimberley Collection KIM 3/22/1; Hamond of Westacre Collection HMN 7/190/15, 771X8; Records of Norwich City Council, Town Clerk's Deeds, N/TC/D1/549/24; ibid, N/TC/D1/549/25; Norwich Consistory Court Probate Records, will register, Pettingill, 416; ibid, will register, Eley, 255; ibid, will register, Wood, 428; ibid, will register, Skepper, 60; ibid, administration act book, 1673-1688, fo. 113; Archdeaconry of Norwich Probate Records, will register, 1806-1808, (1808) fo. 101, no. 70; ibid, will register, 1835-1839, (1837) fo. 22, no. 19; ibid, will register, Mullinger, 75; Records of Norwich City Council, Town Clerk's Deeds, N/TC/D1/95/6 306X1; ibid, N/TC/D1/95/7 306X1; ibid, N/TC/D1/95/8 306X1; ibid, N/TC/D1/95/9 306X1; ibid, N/TC/D1/95/11 306X1; ibid, N/TC/D1/95/5 306X1; ibid, N/TC/D1/81/29 299X3; ibid, N/TC/D1/556/46; ibid, ibid, N/TC/D1/556/47; ibid, N/TC/D1/556/49; ibid, N/TC/D1/556/50; ibid, N/TC/D1/557/6; ibid, N/TC/D1/557/21; ibid, N/TC/D1/557/8; Records of F. Lambert and Son Ltd., Tea Merchants, Tobacconists and Confectioners - BR 74/2.
[10] IGI, sundry, outside of Norwich, Co Norfolk.
[11] Freereg, http://www.freereg.ork.uk, outside of Norwich, Co Norfolk.
[12] Norfolk Records Office, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/DServe/public/searches/nroquick.htm>, mattishall + chamberl*: Parish Records of North Tuddenham, Mattishall and Mattishall Burgh Charities, PD 387/72 & PD 387/73; Parish Records of Mattishall, Deeds of Harlestones' Charity, PD 703/231; ibid, Apprenticeship indentures, PD 703/141/1; ibid, Churchwardens' accounts, PD 703/63; ibid, Deeds of Mary Thornton's Charity, PD 703/238; ibid, Church and benefice, PD 703/43; Norwich Consistory Court Probate Records, administration bonds, 1742, no. 19; ibid, will register, Leatherdale, 213; Archdeaconry of Norfolk Probate Records, will register, 1731-1737, fo. 221, (1740-1742, no. 115); ibid, will register, 1731-1737, fo. 169, (1733-1735, no. 108); ibid, will register, 1713-1716, fo. 47, no. 108; ibid, will register, 1764-1767, fo. 343, (1767, no. 58); Wodehouse of Kimberley Collection, Title Deeds, KIM 2L/6; ibid, KIM 2Q/17; Bodham Family Estate Papers, MC 2179/7, 937X8; ibid, MC 2179/8, 937X8; ibid, MC 2179/10, 937X9; ibid, MC 2179/11, 937X9; ibid, MC 2179/12, 938X1; ibid, MC 2179/13, 938X1; ibid, MC 2179/15, 938X1; ibid, MC 2179/16, 938X2.
[13] National Archives, <http://www.nationalarchives.org.uk>, mattishall + chamberl*. Wills of Colvie Chamberlaine (1712), Nicholas Chamberlain (1715) & William Chamberlain (1680).
[14] 1851 Norfolk census, LDS CD-ROM Edition
[15] http://www.genealogy.doun.org/transcriptions: Chamberl* + Mattishall
[16] Norfolk Records Office, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/DServe/public/searches/nroquick.htm>, trowse +chamberl* Parish Records of Trowse, Settlement Certificates, PD 216/86/124; ibid, PD 216/86/5; Peculiar of the Dean & Chapter Probate Records, Will Register (VII), PRDC 1/2/10 f.179; ibid, PRDC 1/2/10 fo.63; ibid, Will Register (VI), PRDC 1/2/9 fo.111; ibid, Administrations, PRDC 2/2/2/43; ibid, Will Register (V), PRDC 1/2/8 fo.119; Norwich Consistory Court Probate Records, Will Register, Veale 465; Papers concerning Property at Norwich St Clement Saham Toney & Salhouse, BRA 219/1-7,714x4
[17] 1841 census, <http://www.1901censusonline.com/census.asp?wci=landing&searchtype=12&searchsubtype=1>.
[18] Williams Latham Tomlin Charlier Genealogy, Kenneth Williams <kwilliams@eptglobal.com>, updated 28/8/2009, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=willperf&id=I349312>.
[19] Post to Rootsweb Norfolk-L mail-list, "MANNERS, FULLER,CHAMBERLIN", by Julie Cooper, 7/2/2008, <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/norfolk/2008>.
[20] Post to Rootsweb Norfolk-L mail-list, "DeFedge anyone??", by Mick Bird, 23/10/2002, <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/norfolk/2002>.
[21] Post to Rootsweb Norfolk-L mail-list, "CHAMBERLIN Family of NORWICH and CATTON", by Susan Grant, 2/9/2000, <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/norfolk/2000-09/0967873988>.
[22] Post to Rootsweb Norfolk-L mail-list, "CHAMBERLIN Family of NORWICH and CATTON", by Derek Brocklebank, 3/9/2000, <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/norfolk/2000-09/0968013317>.
[23] Norfolk Records Office, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/DServe/public/searches/nroquick.htm> 'edward + chamberl* +cressingham' & 'rev* + edward + chamberl*': Parish Records of Swaffham, Church and Benefice, PD 52/54; ibid, PD 52/55; Mills of Hilborough Collection, Title Deeds HIL 1/152/1-13 & HIL 1/153, 870X8; Walsingham (Merton) Collection, Estate Papers, WLS XXXV/3 418X7 & WLS XXVI/4 418X8; ibid, WLS XII/21, 409X5; ibid, WLS XIX/28-31, 411X6; ibid, WLS XXIX/9, 416X5; Papers Relating to the Living of Fincham, MC 2341/8 962X3; ibid, MC 2341/5 962X3; Parish Records of Great Cressingham, Church and Benefice, PD 131/52; ibid, PD 131/53; Bradfer-Lawrence Collection, BL/F 3/19; Norwich Diocesan Archives, Probate Inventories, DN/INV 60A/85.
[24] 'Hundred of South Greenhoe: Great-Cressingham', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 6 (1807), pp. 94-107. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78234 Date accessed: 14 September 2009. Also 'Hundred of South Greenhoe: Bodney', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 6 (1807), pp. 15-19. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78223 Date accessed: 14 September 2009.
[25] Ancestral File: Edward CHAMBERLAYNE (AFN: 18HX-50T).
[26] Adrian Critten "Family Tree", updated 9/4/2006, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3207541&id=I602406297>.
[27] Post to GenForum: Chamberlain Family Genealogy Forum, "Stanley Chamberlin b. London abt 1858 d. Australia", by James Parker, 21/9/2008, <http://www.jenforum.com/chamberlain/messages/3833.html>.
[28] 1813 to 1880 Baptism Project: Trowse St Andrew, <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tinstaafl/Church_Pages/trowse.htm>.
[29] Stuttard Genealogy, Brian Stuttard, updated 31/8/2008, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=boroboy1948&id=I29201>.
[30] Evans Genealogy, Maureen Evans, updated 13/8/2008, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dogsbody&id=I35011>.
[31] 1861 census, chamber* + norfolk, <http://www.1901censusonline.com/census.asp?wci=landing&searchtype=13&>.
[32] Wainwright Family Tree, Peter Wainwright, updated 30/3/2009, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=peter1951&id=I04653>.
[33] National Burial Index, 2nd Edition, 2004, Federation of Family History Societies
[34] FreeBMD, <http://freebmd.org.uk/cgi/search.pl>.
[35] "Visitations of Norfolk, 1563, 2589 & 1613", Harleian Society, 1891, Walter Rye (Ed).
[36] Norfolk Records Office, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/DServe/public/searches/nroquick.htm> 'chamber* + barnham*': Miscellaneous Papers, MC 523/1 759X2; Wodehouse of Kimberley Collection: KIM 2A/19; ibid, KIM 2L/23-35; ibid, KIM 3/2/1; ibid, KIM 3/3/2; Archdeaconry of Norfolk Probate Records: administration act book, 1611-1619, fo. 14; ibid, will register Liber 23 (Annyson), fo. 179; Norwich Consistory Court Probate Records: administration act book, 1589-1605, fo. 41; ibid, administration act book, 1570-1579, fo. 327; Title Deeds and Estate Papers of the Gurdon family of Cranworth with Letton: MC 76/26/1-13 534X1.
[37] Ancestral File: Edward CHAMBERLAIN (AFN:TFF6-L1).
[38] Monumental Norwich Characters: Joseph Chamberlin (1712 – 1762), <http://www.norwichchurches.co.uk/monuments/Joseph%20Chamberlin/Joseph%20Chamberlin.html>.
[39] Pedigree Resource File, Submission Search: 1904550-0109106224149 (Chamberlain), Joan Attridge Johnston.
[40] Wikipedia: George Chamberlin, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Chamberlin>.
[41] Norwich: Mayors, Lord Mayors and Sheriffs, 1835 - 1990, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/n/norwich/mayors_and_sheriffs.shtml>.
[42] "The church heraldry of Norfolk: a description of all coats of arms on brasses, monuments, slabs, hatchments, &c., now to be found in the county. Illustrated. With references to Blomefield's History of Norfolk and Burke's Armory. Together with notes from the inscriptions attached", Vol 1., Edmund Farrer, 1887, A.H. Goose and co, Norwich (pub); <http://www.archive.org/stream/churchheraldryn01farrgoog/churchheraldryn01farrgoog_djvu.txt>.
[43] "Biographical Register of Christ's College 1505-1905 & of the Earlier Foundation, God's House 1448-1505", Vol.2 (1666-1905), John Peile, Cambridge University Press, 1913; <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=I9s8AAAAIAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s>.
[44] "1664 Hearth Taxes-MATTISHALL part 2", posted to NORFOLK-L Archives, 1/7/2000, by Margaret Keable, <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/norfolk/2000-07/0962447871>.
[45] Norfolk Pubs: White Heart, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norwich/wnorwich/ncwha3.htm>.
[46] Extract from 1861 Norfolk census, posted to NORFOLK-L mail-list, 8/5/2006, by David Tennant, "New York to Forncett", <http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/norfolk/2006-05/1147092863>.
[47] "Loyalist Descendants of New Brunswick and Maine Plus Others", Arnold E. Kraus, updated 26/8/2009, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=aek740a&id=I005843>.
[48] Norfolk Records Office: Wymondham + Chamberlain; Archdeaconry of Norfolk Probate Records, administration act book, 1611-1619 fo. 65; ibid, 1541-1602 fo. 234; ibid, Liber 27 (Porridge) fo. 56.
[49] State Papers Domestic: SP 46/38/fo 349, National Archives, <http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATLN=7&CATID=-2701490&j=1>.
[50] Property papers  BRA 219/1-7, 714 x 4  1815-1874, National Archives, <http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk>.
[51] "The poll for members of Parliament for the city and county of Norwich, taken on the 29th and 30th days of July, 1830. By permission of the sheriffs", Bacon and Kinnebrook (pub); <http://www.archive.org/details/pollformembersof00norwiala>. Names Charles & Henry of Lakenham, Henry Jr of St Stephen, Henry & Robert of Mancroft, George Michael of St John Timberhill, William of St George Colegate, Edward of St Simon & St Jude and Samuel of St Saviour, all identified, along with Henry (dyer) of St Julian & Thomas (grocer) of Heigham, both unidentified.
[52] "Lamb Jones Rutherford MacLeod Whitehouse Blair", Barbara S., updated 2/5/2009, <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=arimathwaite&id=I42610>.
[53] Norfolk Pubs: Old Lobster, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norwich/onorwich/ncoll.htm>.
[54] Norfolk Pubs: Corn Exchange, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norwich/cnorwich/nccoe3.htm>.

[55] A Guide to Artifacts of Colonial America, Ivor NoŽl Hume, Uni. Penn. Press, 2001 Edn, p.254, <http://books.google.com.au/books?id=-DCyLQP8y08C&source=gbs_navlinks_s>. Also: Timeline Originals, Medieval Pins and Fasteners for sale, <http://time-lines.co.uk/medieval-artefacts-for-sale-959-0.html>. Also: The West Kingdom Needleworkers Guild, Christian de Holacombe and Michaela de Neuville, <http://wkneedle.bayrose.org/Articles/period_workbox.html>.
[56] Wills of William Blythe of Mattishall, dated 4/7/1688, proved 17/12/1691; also of Mary Blyth of Mattishall, dated 28/2/1711. From Chris Blyth, <chris.blyth2 @ btopenworld.com>, 4/2/2010.
[57] Will of Anne Howlett of Mattishall, dated 20/5/1671 & proven 27/1/1673. From Marilyn Dahneke, <msdahneke @ gmail.com>, 10/2/2010.
[58] Personal correspondence, no name given, <pi59428 @ bigpond.net.au>, 11/4/2010.
[59] 1881 census, CD-ROM Edition, LDS, 1999.